A new country!!! And what a way to enter it. Not some dull border post but with a ferry. Leaving Botswana was easy. A couple of stamps in our passports, registering our car and we where done. After passing a lot of trucks for a couple of kilometers (‘small’ cars can go first) we could easily get on the ferry. The only thing you need to be careful of is not hitting one of the dozen ‘fixers’ who jump in front of your car to ‘help’ you at the Zambian border post.

Eight counters to go

Victoria Falls

The Kazungula border post was a proper African one. After paying the ferry we had to obtain a visa at the first counter. At the second counter our temperature was measured to see if we didn’t bring any weird diseases into the country. Then we had show our Carnet de Passage which was stamped on one side at the third counter whereas the fourth counter stamped it again but on the other side. We had to pay our ‘Carbon Tax’ at the fifth counter and a local tax called the Kazungula District Council Levy at the sixth. At the seventh counter we payed our Road Tax after which we got our local third party insurance for our car at the eighth and final counter. In the meantime an ATM decided to deduct €336,- from our account without actually handing over the money. Let’s call it an interesting start of Zambia.

One thing we did notice immediately was how friendly the locals were. Everyone is smiling all the time and would like to talk with you as long as possible.

A lunar rainbow. What?! A lunar rainbow!

Once in Livingstone we checked in to our guesthouse. After camping for 42 days in a row we finally had a mattress thicker than 4 centimeter! Moreover there was an Ocean Basket, a South-African chain of fish restaurants, in Livingstone so we enjoyed some sushi although we were hours away from any sea. With this in mind we had an excellent lunch!

The big thing in Livingstone are the Victoria Falls though. The falls are located at the border of Zimbabwe and Zambia. Since it only stopped raining a couple of weeks ago there is a tremendous amount of water in the Zambezi river that leads to the falls. It also happened to be full moon that night. At these nights the park opens at night to watch the falls in the light of the moon. If you are super lucky and there’s a clear sky you can see a lunar rainbow in the spray of the falls. We never heard of this until a couple of days ago.

Tadaaaaa

While we saw the sunset at the falls and got soaking wet from the spray in the meantime we prepared ourselves for a possible lunar rainbow. With our new friends from Livingstone and Nigeria which we met at the falls we were waiting patiently. While it was cloudy at sunset the sky opened up more and more and all of a sudden the moon was there. More importantly we saw the lunar rainbow appearing! Out of nowhere the moon appeared when the clouds move. With an aperture of three minutes (!) we managed to capture it as well. What a special moment. Even more so since this phenomenon can only be seen at a couple of places on earth. We finished the day with the best pizza we had in Africa so far. At Olga’s in Livingstone they’ve got a perfect Pizza Napolitana with fresh anchovies baked in a wood-fired oven. What a day!

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